FloridaStreetScene

Go Back   FloridaStreetScene > Community Forums > Automotive News and Information

Notices

Automotive News and Information Here you will find news, videos and other information related to cars, trucks and motorcycles.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-09-2013, 09:25 AM   #1
MotorcyclistOnline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 116
MotorcyclistOnline has much to be proud of, 50-99
Info When to Replace the Chain | Tooth or Consequences

When to Replace the Chain | Tooth or Consequences


Don't wait until your chain snaps to replace it. There are several ways to track wear over a chain's life. The easiest is by grabbing a link on the back of the rear sprocket and pulling it away from the teeth. The farther back you can pull it, the more worn the chain is. Refer to the chain manufacturer, or your bike’s manual, to see how far is too far. As a general rule, half a tooth is the tipping point.

A more accurate method is to put the transmission in gear and turn the rear wheel backward until the top run of the chain is under tension. This compresses the lubricant in the links. Then measure a length of chain a specified number of links long, and check the figure against the factory wear specs. Of course, if the notch on the rear-axle puller is lined up with the last mark on the swingarm, it’s probably game over for the chain. (But be aware that a previous owner might have installed a too-long chain and the only problem is that you’re out of adjustment range; counting the distance between links is always best.)

Chain sizes may seem to be made up by a madman, but are actually just code for the pitch, or pin-to-pin distance, expressed in eighths of an inch, and for the inside width of the chain, again in eighths of an inch. A 530 chain has a pitch of 5⁄8 in. (5), and a width of 3⁄8 in. (3.0). A 525 chain has a 5⁄8 in. pitch and is 2.5 eighths wide, or 5⁄16 in. Depending on the displacement of the bike, the chain will come with a clip-type master link or a rivet-type—some replacement chains come with both. The rivet type is best for large-displacement bikes but requires special tools; it’s less convenient but arguably stronger.

The toughness of a chain is often expressed in terms of tensile strength. But tensile strength is really only one component of a much more important characteristic—fatigue resistance. Good materials and construction contribute to high fatigue resistance. A chain with a higher tensile strength will probably, but not always, have higher fatigue resistance.

Finally, it’s best to replace the chain and sprockets at the same time. They wear in to each other over time, and replacing one and not the other creates a mismatch that results in higher load and faster wear for both components. Yes, we know a lot of owners skip this step, but it’s virtually guaranteed that the second chain won’t last as long as the first. Most chain manufacturers sell kits composed of a chain and sprockets, some of which are offered with several gearing options. Finally, while you’re replacing the rear sprocket, check the wheel bearings and hub dampers, and replace those if needed.

More @ MotorcyclistOnline.com
MotorcyclistOnline is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
GM and Disney sign new deal to replace 13-year-old Test Track attraction AutoBlog Automotive News and Information 0 01-12-2012 11:22 AM
GM to Replace 2.4-liter Fours with 2.5-liters Across the Range Car&Driver Automotive News and Information 0 01-10-2012 03:54 PM
Next-Generation Full-Size Ford Transit to Partially Replace E-Series Van in 2013 Car&Driver Automotive News and Information 0 12-08-2011 01:54 PM
I HHHHHAAATE! Timing chain engines!!!! SS Z31 General Automotive Discusions 10 12-11-2008 01:44 AM
this will replace the spinner lO.ol General Automotive Discusions 14 03-27-2006 11:19 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 09:09 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.0
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
The forum is protected by expressed copyright and the information contained within this forum is intended for its members to be used here and is privileged to the valued users of this forum. You are notified that any use, dissemination, or coping of the information here is not permitted without the permission of the administration.